Tag Archives: writing tips

Meet Maggie Christensen, author of ‘Champagne for Breakfast’

Welcome, Maggie, and thank you for coming to my author chat. Also, congratulations on the release of your sixth novel, Champagne for Breakfast. With an alluring cover shot of the Noosa River and a catchy title, it’s sure to enjoy great … Continue reading

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#Editing 101: the fine-tooth comb method for line editing

If you’re a parent with a young child, you’ve probably discovered the joys of head lice. Pesky little beasties, they’re ridiculously hard to get rid of. Even when you’ve blasted them with a cocktail of chemicals and raked out their … Continue reading

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Words, precious words

With a new novel out recently, I’ve been attending lots of writerly events to promote my work and hopefully sell enough books to cover costs. This is what I love about the writing journey. This is when you meet all … Continue reading

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Five Qs for author Nene Davies

My guest author today is the vivacious Nene Davies, author of the ‘Distance’ series. Besides writing novels, she is an avid blogger and Facebook contributor. Her blog, which focuses on interviews of people in the writing and creative space, has the intriguing name … Continue reading

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Left, Right, Left … Write. Do-it-yourself structural editing.

What I love about writing crime mysteries is the constant interplay between the left and the right hemispheres of my brain. The trick is to make them work together. The left brain gathers data, information and facts. For my current work … Continue reading

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Characters in crime

One of my greatest ah-haa! moments in learning to write creatively was realising that characters are the essential essence of a good story. Whether you are writing memoir or romance or fantasy, or (as I do) historical fiction and crime, … Continue reading

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Construct … deconstruct … reconstruct

Writers often debate about the best way to write: plot-driven or character-driven. Plot-driven implies vast sheets of butchers paper covered in post-it notes, or timelines nutted out on Excel or some other left-brain device. You know the story, you know the … Continue reading

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