Author Archives: Debbie Terranova

About Debbie Terranova

I write stories of mystery, history, and adventure that will inspire readers to question accepted 'truths' and discover alternative explanations. I call this approach ‘fiction with a conscience’. While settings, historical events, and some characters may be real or based on research, the narratives and central characters are generally the creation of my imagination. I have published three stand-alone novels with a fourth due out in 2021.

The Quiet Voice: a short read about growing up in the 70s

The bartender called for last drinks. Closing time: eleven o’clock on a Friday night. The band was packing up; the patrons were drifting out. The four of us were reluctant to part. ‘Come to my place for coffee.’ A statement, … Continue reading

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Human rights tyrants and how to stop them

Bad People – and How to Be Rid of Them: A Plan B for Human Rights by Geoffrey Robertson My rating: 4 of 5 stars While this book provides a history of human rights dating right back to the 17th … Continue reading

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‘The Next Twenty Years’: my short story in ‘Pen and Pixel’

Inspired by a turning point in my life, ‘The Next Twenty Years’ is a reflective piece about change and resilience. My short story was penned for a monthly competition run by the Queensland Writers’ Centre for their online magazine, ‘Pen … Continue reading

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Recommended for fans of convict-era historical fiction

Fled by Meg Keneally My rating: 4 of 5 stars Convict-era historical fiction based on the true story of the daring escape of Mary Bryant (and others) in an open boat from Sydney Cove to Kupang, Timor. The known aspects … Continue reading

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WWII in pictures: the voyage of the notorious ‘Dunera’

Dunera Lives: A Visual History by Jay Winter My rating: 5 of 5 stars Beautifully put together, this visual history shows through paintings, cartoons, photographs what happened to a shipload of German, Italian, and Jewish men – most of whom … Continue reading

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‘In the Moment’ – The Lockdown Diaries

Recently the Queensland Writers Centre called for short stories (500 words) for an online anthology, The Lockdown Diaries. No prizes for guessing that the topic was personal experiences of COVID-19 during 2020. My story ‘In the Moment’ was one of … Continue reading

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An escape to the magical ‘deep country’ of our ancient land

All Our Shimmering Skies by Trent Dalton My rating: 4 of 5 stars An epic tale, in the spirit of the Brothers Grimm, set in the impossibly harsh country of Australia’s Top End. The characters are intriguing and larger-than-life, in … Continue reading

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‘Unorthodox’: a heroic escape from oppression

Unorthodox: The Scandalous Rejection of My Hasidic Roots by Deborah Feldman My rating: 5 of 5 stars Like many other readers, I discovered the existence of ‘Unorthodox’ while binge-watching the enthralling four-part series of the same name. The memoir (a … Continue reading

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An unusual take on WWII espionage

Warlight by Michael Ondaatje My rating: 5 of 5 stars A beautifully-written historical novel, from start to finish. For someone who likes to write, such as me, the use of language is inspirational. Delightful and succinct descriptions abound, e.g. ‘we … Continue reading

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Literary fiction at its best

A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles My rating: 5 of 5 stars This is, without a doubt, the most uplifting novel I have read in years. Beautifully written and engrossing from start to finish, it is the story of … Continue reading

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